Elizabeth Price: Slow Dans; Tavares Strachan: In Plain Sight – review

The Assembly Room; Marian Goodman Gallery, London
The 2012 Turner prize-winner cleverly baffles and enthrals by turn, while the first UK show for Bahamian artist Tavares Strachan is a feast for the senses

The artist Elizabeth Price is queen of the screen when it comes to the splicing of word with image. At 53, she has found innumerable ways to overlay film with text to strange and shattering effect. From the early User Group Disco (2009), with its satirical blend of B-movies, pop songs and pompous French theory, to her Turner prize-winning The Woolworths Choir of 1979 (2012), which rose to its tragic peak in a crescendo of data, newsreel, smoke and singing, her work is unique and unforgettable. And so it is again with the trilogy of works presented by Artangel in Slow Dans.

In the darkness of a 19th-century assembly room, Price’s films pulse and glow on high walls above you. The first, Kohl, inverts the world, with photographs of disused collieries turned upside down so they seem suddenly alien and new. Clattering across the screen – split in three like a medieval triptych – runs a typewritten dialogue. The old mines are filling with water, we hear, and it’s gradually seeping from one shaft to another. Below us is a building tide.

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Source : Elizabeth Price: Slow Dans; Tavares Strachan: In Plain Sight – review